Ka'Chava

My Daughter Loves Healthy Food!
Here’s How We Did It. (8 Tips)

My Daughter Loves Healthy Food!
Here’s How We Did It. (7 Tips)

23/03/19 | Mariia Goldschmidt | @tofu_fit_girl

23/03/19 | Mariia Goldschmidt | @tofu_fit_girl

If you're a parent you know it's hard... Kids can be picky, unhealthy foods are marketed everywhere, healthy food doesn't always taste good and coming up with something different every day is difficult! But it doesn't have to be this way...

Here are my 8 easy tips you can start using this week:

1. Let Your Kids Help Prepare the Meal

This is my #1, #2, and #3 recommendation. Nothing in the world has more power to shape your child’s food choices than giving them ownership over the process.

I let my daughter help cut the vegetables and fruit. She helps mix, measure ingredients, and as much else as she can do at her age. By giving her a role in the cooking process, she will be far more likely to want to eat the final product.

Again – if you do nothing else, this single strategy by itself will transform how your kids view their food. Don’t let them sit off by themselves staring at screens while you work hard making meals. Get them involved. It will also strengthen your relationship as a family. (And teaching your kids how to work with tools and measuring amounts of things is a great way to learn math and motor skills. Bonus!)

2. Show How One Ingredient Can Substitute for Another

Once you have them helping in the kitchen, now you can start explaining things to them. Because we’re eating a plant-based diet, my goal is to show my daughter some of the things we can substitute for animal products. Flaxseed replaces eggs. Tahini (from sesame seeds) replaces butter.

Besides that, there are other more healthful ingredients you can substitute for less healthy ones – even in desserts. You can make cookies with dark chocolate instead of milk chocolate. Use oat flour instead of white flour. Use dates and maple syrup in place of white sugar.

With your kids helping, you can explain to them why you’re using this instead of what the printed recipe might call for. Your kids will begin to think that way too when they see you doing this as a lifestyle. And when they realize the food still tastes good, the argument is over!

3. Take Your Kids Shopping, and Let Them Choose Some Items

You have to be strategic about this. Don’t go down the snack aisle and say, “Pick what you want, sweetie.” That kind of defeats the purpose. Likewise, don’t go down aisles filled with processed foods.

When you’re in the fresh food section, let your kids pick items from there. You might actually find your kids will like something even you don’t like that much. And they might like it simply because they got to choose it. A good portion of our taste preferences are psychological. They will want to like it, because they chose it.

Again, this gives them ownership over what they eat, but within boundaries you approve.

4. Smoothies Are
Healthy & Fun For Kids

You can also make food fun. You can use fruits and vegetables to make funny faces on the plate. Laughter breaks down defenses. Colorful food is more fun than ugly food (even if the ugly food tastes great). Spinach turns pasta sauce into a bright green color, for instance. Bright smoothies are appealing to kids, and super healthy.

I especially like smoothies and shakes, because kids love throwing stuff into the blender and watching it mix and grind up. And you can put so many different things in there and it still tastes good. I love Ka’Chava for smoothies and shakes because it’s completely plant-based and has so many great nutrients as well as protein. And I can mix it up by adding various fruits. I sometimes even add it to muffins and other baked items.

5. Lead By Example

It doesn’t work too well to make your kids eat healthy food if you’re snacking on potato chips and candy all day. That should be obvious.

Have healthy snacks, and your kids will eat healthy snacks. If they don’t like one vegetable, offer them another vegetable instead. Offer fruit instead of chips. At ages like 2 and 3, you have to be persistent at this. You might have a few meltdowns. It’s part of the process. You can work through them if you’re determined, and your child will eventually figure out that this is how we do it in our family.

When your kids see you eating these foods, they’ll catch on eventually.

6. Teach Your Kids Where Food Comes from

Explaining that tomatoes grow on plants and that potato chips are produced in a factory will fascinate your child. My daughter understands enough about cow’s milk and where that comes from that she can tell her friends at school why she doesn’t drink it.

Even if you’re eating animal products, you can still teach your kids about processed foods, and why they need so much salt, and about all the chemicals that get added. Some foods are invented, you could say, but other foods are grown. If you can do even a small vegetable garden, it will work wonders for your child’s perceptions of food.

7. Discuss Food and Health Frequently

Kids learn from habit and repetition. We talk about food all the time. The questions about what’s healthy, where it comes from, and why we eat this way get answered on a daily basis.

If you’re eating together, and preparing food together, why not also talk about it together?

At the store, we talk about what we’re buying, and why. You might need to spend some time learning about why certain fruits, vegetables, seeds, grains, beans, and other items are healthy, and why others are not. It will be worth the time, because your kids will be armed with knowledge, rather than just being preached at about how “this is good for you so just eat it.”

I never have to say that to my daughter.

But I do tell her that when she’s older, she can make her own choices about how she wants to eat.

8. Prep Your Food In Advance

t does take more time to prepare a healthy meal than to throw a frozen dinner in the oven. I solve this by preparing all my meals for the week in one day. I cut up most of the fresh items I’ll be needing, as well as other ingredients, and then put them in the freezer or the refrigerator until the day I’ll use them.

And we usually make large enough dinners that the leftovers serve as lunches the next day. If you plan ahead, eating healthy doesn’t take much more time on the actual day of the meal.

Planning the week in advance also helps me maintain a good variety of meals.

1. Let Your Kids Help Prepare the Meal

This is my #1, #2, and #3 recommendation. Nothing in the world has more power to shape your child’s food choices than giving them ownership over the process.

I let my daughter help cut the vegetables and fruit. She helps mix, measure ingredients, and as much else as she can do at her age. By giving her a role in the cooking process, she will be far more likely to want to eat the final product.

Again – if you do nothing else, this single strategy by itself will transform how your kids view their food. Don’t let them sit off by themselves staring at screens while you work hard making meals. Get them involved. It will also strengthen your relationship as a family. (And teaching your kids how to work with tools and measuring amounts of things is a great way to learn math and motor skills. Bonus!)

2. Show How One Ingredient Can Substitute for Another

Once you have them helping in the kitchen, now you can start explaining things to them. Because we’re eating a plant-based diet, my goal is to show my daughter some of the things we can substitute for animal products. Flaxseed replaces eggs. Tahini (from sesame seeds) replaces butter.

Besides that, there are other more healthful ingredients you can substitute for less healthy ones – even in desserts. You can make cookies with dark chocolate instead of milk chocolate. Use oat flour instead of white flour. Use dates and maple syrup in place of white sugar.

With your kids helping, you can explain to them why you’re using this instead of what the printed recipe might call for. Your kids will begin to think that way too when they see you doing this as a lifestyle. And when they realize the food still tastes good, the argument is over!

3. Take Your Kids Shopping, and Let Them Choose Some Items

You have to be strategic about this. Don’t go down the snack aisle and say, “Pick what you want, sweetie.” That kind of defeats the purpose. Likewise, don’t go down aisles filled with processed foods.

When you’re in the fresh food section, let your kids pick items from there. You might actually find your kids will like something even you don’t like that much. And they might like it simply because they got to choose it. A good portion of our taste preferences are psychological. They will want to like it, because they chose it.

Again, this gives them ownership over what they eat, but within boundaries you approve.

4. Make Healthy Food Fun With Smoothies

You can also make food fun. You can use fruits and vegetables to make funny faces on the plate. Laughter breaks down defenses. Colorful food is more fun than ugly food (even if the ugly food tastes great). Spinach turns pasta sauce into a bright green color, for instance. Bright smoothies are appealing to kids, and super healthy.

I especially like smoothies and shakes, because kids love throwing stuff into the blender and watching it mix and grind up. And you can put so many different things in there and it still tastes good. I love Ka’Chava for smoothies and shakes because it’s completely plant-based and has so many great nutrients as well as protein. And I can mix it up by adding various fruits. I sometimes even add it to muffins and other baked items.

5. Lead By Example

It doesn’t work too well to make your kids eat healthy food if you’re snacking on potato chips and candy all day. That should be obvious.

Have healthy snacks, and your kids will eat healthy snacks. If they don’t like one vegetable, offer them another vegetable instead. Offer fruit instead of chips. At ages like 2 and 3, you have to be persistent at this. You might have a few meltdowns. It’s part of the process. You can work through them if you’re determined, and your child will eventually figure out that this is how we do it in our family.

When your kids see you eating these foods, they’ll catch on eventually.

6. Teach Your Kids Where Food Comes from

Explaining that tomatoes grow on plants and that potato chips are produced in a factory will fascinate your child. My daughter understands enough about cow’s milk and where that comes from that she can tell her friends at school why she doesn’t drink it.

Even if you’re eating animal products, you can still teach your kids about processed foods, and why they need so much salt, and about all the chemicals that get added. Some foods are invented, you could say, but other foods are grown. If you can do even a small vegetable garden, it will work wonders for your child’s perceptions of food.

7. Discuss Food and Health Frequently

Kids learn from habit and repetition. We talk about food all the time. The questions about what’s healthy, where it comes from, and why we eat this way get answered on a daily basis.

If you’re eating together, and preparing food together, why not also talk about it together?

At the store, we talk about what we’re buying, and why. You might need to spend some time learning about why certain fruits, vegetables, seeds, grains, beans, and other items are healthy, and why others are not. It will be worth the time, because your kids will be armed with knowledge, rather than just being preached at about how “this is good for you so just eat it.”

I never have to say that to my daughter.

But I do tell her that when she’s older, she can make her own choices about how she wants to eat.

8. Prep Your Food In Advance

It does take more time to prepare a healthy meal than to throw a frozen dinner in the oven. I solve this by preparing all my meals for the week in one day. I cut up most of the fresh items I’ll be needing, as well as other ingredients, and then put them in the freezer or the refrigerator until the day I’ll use them.

And we usually make large enough dinners that the leftovers serve as lunches the next day. If you plan ahead, eating healthy doesn’t take much more time on the actual day of the meal.

Planning the week in advance also helps me maintain a good variety of meals.

 

 

 

Just Remember…

The most important step was the first one: Let your kids help you make meals.

If you do nothing else yet, start with that. Get them involved in the process. Then, as you start trying new recipes and adding in healthy ingredients, it will feel natural to them, and they won’t question it. Especially at young ages. They’ll just be thrilled to get to hang out with you and do something together. If you need healthy recipe ideas, follow me on Instagram. I post something almost every day!

And make sure to check out Ka'Chava. My whole family loves it!

 


Mariia Goldschmidt is an advocate for family plant-based living and Ka'Chava Ambassador. She teaches others how to not only survive, but thrive on a plant-based diet!

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Ready-To-Go Meal... That Actually Tastes Good!

100% Money Back Guarantee. Learn More

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